One of the most com­mon mis­con­cep­tions that one has to face is the mis­con­cep­tion that it is enough just to install the exhaust part of the ven­ti­la­tion sys­tem, and a com­fort­able micro­cli­mate is guar­an­teed. But in prac­tice, every­thing is far from what it might seem. For exam­ple, a good proof of this is the sit­u­a­tion with the room in which plas­tic win­dows are installed. There is prac­ti­cal­ly no ven­ti­la­tion in such a room, espe­cial­ly if the win­dows in the room are closed. At the same time, even open exhaust vents in the bath­room or in the kitchen will not save the sit­u­a­tion. You need to under­stand that the air must “come” from some­where in order to “come out” lat­er.

One of the most com­mon mis­con­cep­tions that one has to face is the mis­con­cep­tion that it is enough just to install the exhaust part of the ven­ti­la­tion sys­tem, and a com­fort­able micro­cli­mate is guar­an­teed.

But in prac­tice, every­thing is far from what it might seem. For exam­ple, a good proof of this is the sit­u­a­tion with the room in which plas­tic win­dows are installed. There is prac­ti­cal­ly no ven­ti­la­tion in such a room, espe­cial­ly if the win­dows in the room are closed. At the same time, even open exhaust vents in the bath­room or in the kitchen will not save the sit­u­a­tion. You need to under­stand that the air must “come” from some­where in order to “come out” lat­er.

The next myth that I would like to debunk is the judg­ment that the ven­ti­la­tion sys­tem is a rather bulky con­trap­tion. Many still believe that the ven­ti­la­tion sys­tem con­sists of large fans, ducts of the same impres­sive size. And all this “mag­nif­i­cence” still needs to be hid­den behind a sus­pend­ed ceil­ing. And the price of such a sys­tem is very high, at least no less than twelve thou­sand dol­lars, and a very good and high-qual­i­ty sys­tem costs about twen­ty-eight thou­sand dol­lars.
In fact, in real­i­ty, a suf­fi­cient air exchange rate in prac­tice turns out to be much less than that cal­cu­lat­ed in accor­dance with the “for­mu­las”.

It is not always clear why many are guid­ed by the stan­dard of 500 m³ of air per thou­sand m2 S per hour. In fact, the air flow rate for a cot­tage, which is char­ac­ter­ized by an aver­age area (about 400 m²), ranges from fifty to two hun­dred m3 / h. In addi­tion, it should be tak­en into account that the num­ber of peo­ple liv­ing in a cot­tage, a house also affects the val­ue of this indi­ca­tor. For exam­ple, in win­ter, it is very impor­tant to car­ry out ven­ti­la­tion in a dosed man­ner. If this process is car­ried out con­tin­u­ous­ly, the air will be very dry.
Myth No. 3 is con­sid­ered to be the belief that the ven­ti­la­tion and air con­di­tion­ing sys­tem must be equipped with “smart con­trollers”, with the lat­est tech­nol­o­gy. If this is not the case, then such a sys­tem is already out­dat­ed and far from per­fect.

Here you must under­stand that in our time, inno­va­tions appear very quick­ly and some­times you just can’t keep up with them. Of course, you always want to keep up with the times, but this entails sig­nif­i­cant costs and invest­ments. But if you are ready and want your air con­di­tion­ing and ven­ti­la­tion sys­tem to be state-of-the-art, be pre­pared to spend an addi­tion­al ten to twen­ty thou­sand dol­lars.

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